14.9.16

Collective Memory

Installation view
Untitled (Kerel's Self Portrait #53
Acrylic and medium on paper
29 1/2" X  43 1/2"
2016

Untitled (Happy Bandits #44)
Acrylic and medium on canvas, metal frame and light
Variable dimensions
2016

Untitled (Kerel's Self Portrait #53
Acrylic and medium on paper
29 1/2" x 43 1/2"
2016 














































Artery Art Space proudly presents “Collective Memory” from September 10 to October 1, 2016 featuring mixed media work and sculptural elements, embroidered textiles, paintings and works on paper, by Jon Cuyson, Arvin Flores, Kat Medina, and Tanya Villanueva. Reflecting on the shuffling diversity of aesthetic manner to plumb the range of subjects and interpretation, Collective Memory explores the notion of pastiche in artistic production to instigate genuine insights apart from formal parody, to become another space and tactic in developing alternate philosophies along with the formation of common cultural consciousness. 

Jon Cuyson creates a constellation of abstract tableux utilizing elements of modernism: its histories, its personalities, its frailties, and its styles, through borrowed forms from theater, readymade and personal objects that function allegorically. This mise-en-scene suggests a memory of modernism as a series of scripted gestures to be arranged, performed, and endlessly repeated. Presenting new figurative paintings using an expressionist trope, Arvin Flores portrays the iconic image of an idiosyncratic pop icon that continues to pervade the collective memory, turning media spectacle into a radical cultural performance that authenticates alienated reality with a passion for the aesthetic. Through a series of textile work called “Its Trash Until There’s a Minder”, Kat Medina embroiders text that suggestively correspond with random textile samples used for upholstery, nominally designating value back to ordinary material like subconscious truth brooding beneath the surface. In here she ponders on the words: “Jungle Fervor” (textile has animals and tribal patterns), “Steal Life” (a textile with pomegranates and leaves), “In the room” (the sample has a full-bodied elephant taking half of the composition), and, “Subtle Pressure” (Geometric pattern in rich and deep colors of green and red). Tanya Villanueva explores gesture and material with smudges and oozes of glittering membranes brandishing the walls like memorials to an ecstatic evening encounter. As part of her artistic process, Villanueva employs the method of embellishment and artificiality as a means of acting out her ideas about reality, edited memories and the discrepancies in between.




11.8.16

Dancing The Shrimp (The Tactical Improvisation of Postcolonial Space Mix)


The stage is set for scenes that rise above the surface,barely above the level. The ground circulates around the museum. In fact, the museum becomes it, surrounded by details of a moving theatre, or better still, aspects of design that make this theatre quite present though also quite elusive, dispersed like the semblance of sea around it.

The trace to history is sheer but salient. Filipino mariners in the nineteenth century jumped off the fabled Manila Galleon and settled in Saint Malo in the Louisiana bayou. This was the kernel of a community that in the 1930's morphed into the Manila Village in Barataria Bay in the Mississippi Delta by the Gulf of Mexico. From such a site came the Manila Men who took off the shells of shrimps by the nimble movement of their adroit feet, conjuring a kind of dance that is also intense, obsessive labor.


The exhibition speaks to this historical moment and restates it across a range of devices that transpose the said narrative or event and its effects. A beguiling scenography thus is created, animated by remixed music of ritual chant and electronic drone, sprawling painting, enigmatic text, costume, museum memorabilia and furniture, and the pervasive tint of blue from both fluorescent and decal. The artist performs diverse roles in making all this happen: researcher, production designer, creative director, music mixer, painter. In this heady ensemble, the tale of the Filipino seafarer named Kerel is inevitably evoked, a traveler across time zones, mired in the fine grain of work, in the silhouette of structure, in the world of water.


While the tangent of history is cast cogently, the mode of knowing is mythic, intuitive, aleatory. The body inhabits a space of fantasy, memory, and the very urgent experiment of figuring out a liquid present: the eye is fooled, the senses swim in various data (sand, mannequin, mirror), and the migrant in the museum finally faces and feels the artifice of relations, or those ties that put in place or shed those layers of self.



Dr. Patrick D. Flores

Curator
University of the Philippines
Vargas Museum



Untitled (I must admit, its getting better..)
Vinyl Decal on museum facade windows
Variable dimensions
2016







Untitled (The Village)
Site-Specific Installation
Acrylic on plywood and on museum column,sand and found museum detritus
Variable dimensions
2016
Untitled (My heart was cracked open many times, but left only the shadow of a scar as it healed)
Acrylic on canvas on plywood, metal hardware, crate, mannequin, wig, light, towel,vest, helmet,roller brush
Variable dimensions
2016
Installation View

 

Detail view
Untitled (You were my therapist back then, you know?)
Acrylic on canvas on plywood, metal, plinth, sewn fabrics, hangers,acrylic on sculpted foam,framed inkjet print,foam board, sand, Tilandsia,yoga mat
Variable dimensions
2016

Installation View




Untitled (Kerel's Self Portrait #8)
Acrylic and medium on paper
29 1/2" x 43 1/2"
2016





Untitled (And I know you're not that man,that mystical gypsy I sharpened my teeth on

and left there on the road)

Acrylic paint on plinths, acrylic on sculpted foam, metal, framed inkjet print, chair, 

borrowed museum artefacts such as wood cane,vase,book,ashtray,acrylic cases

Variable dimensions

2016
Detail view




Untitled (I was conceived when my father came home from sea...)
Acrylic on paper, acrylic on metal scaffold, platform
4 feet x 33 feet
2016

Detail view


Untitled (I want to get past the pain, but I never want to forget it..)
Acrylic on plywood, fabric curtains,curtain rods,sculpted foam,ladder, insulation tape,mirror, iTouch, speakers,2-minute looped sound piece
Variable dimensions
2016



Detail view

Installation View



Untitled (The dust of the enchanted miles sticks in my throat,muddy, and brings quiet to the rage)
Acrylic on canvas on plywood, hardware, sculpted foam, motor, sand, mannequin, gloves, dust mask,
sewn fabric , vest, lights, acrylic wall stickers
Variable dimensions
2016

Performance


Collaborative performance with Daloy Dance Company






23.4.16

South by Southeast. A Further Surface curated by Patrick D. Flores & Anca Verona Mihulet

Jon Cuyson
Dream Sequence Scene #88 (Sea of Love), 2016
site-specific intervention, wood and sand
variable dimensions
Kerel, 2013
video projection
 6’42’

http://en.timesmuseum.org/exhibitions/detail/id-692/




Common is the notion that the south lies at the opposite of north and that the north is supposedly ascendant, more prone to power, and closer to the imagined center. The south is cast as the peripheral and the dispossessed and that it gathers at the perceived fringes of province on a map of asymmetries. Such a curiouspsycho-geographical, or geopolitical, imagination yields another antinomy: the west and the east, bearing more or less equivalent valences as north and south. This procedure of organizing the world reduces the latter into polarities and verticalities, the west is modern and everywhere yet the east is timeless and afar. The situation where the south and the east cohere to form the coordinate of the southeast is exceptional. It is possibly a double negation: not north, not west. And as such, it is a productive locus: it is not the center, twice.

Commencing from a specific geography and a state of mind to generate a certain way of observing and understanding locality, the exhibition South by Southeast. A Further Surface discusses the spectral idea of artistic initiative through the lens of materiality and reciprocity as poignant and also resolute stances. The body of works presented in the exhibition centers on “Southeast” as a trope to understand the world today. The socio-political tensions in Southeast Asia and Southeast Europe have informed the art works produced in these regions, in the same way that certain prominent ideas nurtured in this artistic environment have raised questions that would shape social policies at a global level – like the interpretation of history, the mediation of archives, or the importance of registering memory. 

The format of bringing together two specific entities in an exhibition gives new sense to our ideas of the world, which functions like a plot for finding concealed or unapparent meanings and alternative structures of identification. It works with a set of coordinates that are interwoven, in which the speculative view of history mingles with the lived story, the conditional aesthetics converges with necessity, the possibilities of the present mixes with the imagination of the future, and the shift from hiding to disappearing leads to re-discovery. 

South by Southeast. A Further Surface is extended from the original concept of South by Southeast held in Osage Art Foundation, Hong Kong in March 2015by the invitation of Guangdong Times Museum. It is a gesture of the Times Museum to trace its location to Southeastern China and to take part in mediating imageries and geopolitical implications of the “Southeast” that were raised in the first part of the exhibition. Artists from Southeast Asia and Southeast Europe are brought together to create an experience that conveys the unique structure of the Southeast. The exhibition display creates the possibility for artists from both areas to relate to each other and to immerse the public in various states of mind.The Hong Kong articulation is further elaborated by bringing in new artists or by expanding the projects of those who had been part of the initial episode. 

Participating artists: Art Labor (Vietnam), Pio Abad (The Philippines), Jon Cuyson (The Philippines), Maung Day (Myanmar), frombandungtoberlin.net (trans-national), Nilbar Güreş (Turkey), Ahdiyat Nur Hartata (Indonesia), Maja Hodošček (Slovenia), Ana Hušman (Croatia), Eisa Jocson (The Philippines), Šejla Kamerić (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Li Jinghu (China), Dalibor Martinis (Croatia), Sebastian Moldovan (Romania), Jakrawal Nilthamrong (Thailand), Aemilia Papaphilippou (Greece), Raluca Popa (Romania), Lia Perjovschi (Romania), Marko Tadić (Croatia), Saša Tkačenko (Serbia), Pradeep Thalawatta (Sri Lanka), The Bureau of Melodramatic Research (Romania), Lyno Vuth (Cambodia), Zhou Tao (China)

Co-curated by Patrick D. Flores (The Philippines) and Anca Verona Mihuleţ (Romania)

17.3.15

South by Southeast curated by Patrick D. Flores and Anca Verona Mihulet March 07 - May 03,2015










South by Southeast, a group exhibition showing works of artists from sixteen different countries, focuses on a very particular area: the southeast.


Commonplace is the notion that the south lies at the opposite of the north, which is supposedly ascendant, more prone to power, closer to the imagined center. The south is cast as peripheral and dispossessed, gathered at the perceived fringes of province on a map of asymmetries. Such a curious psycho-geographical, or geopolitical imagination yields another antinomy: the west and the east, bearing more or less equivalent valences as north and south. In this attempt at reducing the world to polarities and verticalities, the west is modern and everywhere and the east is timeless and far. Exceptional is the situation in which the south and the east cohere to form the coordinate of the southeast, possibly a double negation: not north, not west.



How do we figure the southeast? And how do we do it across the globe in which lateral coordinates might emerge? This is an initial effort and it involves contemplating a possible liaison between two articulations of the south east, one in Asia, the other in Europe, both rendered proximate in such a way that they converse across distance and form vectors of relations that craft robust narratives of the contemporary and of history, categories to which the term is appended: contemporary art and history of art / art history.



Artists:
Pio Abad, Ana Adamovic, Apparatus 22, Jon Cuyson, Maung DayDoplgenger, Koken Ergun, Dex Fernandez, Ahdiyat Nur Hartata, Ivan Hrkas, Istvan Ist Huzjan, Ana Husman, Eisa Jocson, Kernel, Andreja Kuluncic, Dalibor Martinis, Sebastian Moldovan, Jakrawal Nilthamrong, Dan Perjovschi, Herra Phalasari, Mark Salvatus, Ali Taptik, Krassimir Terziev, Pradeep Thalawatta, Trung Cuong Tung, Lyno Vuth, Leung Chi Wo, Yao Jui Ching

Address: OSAGE Gallery, 4/F, Union Hing Yip Factory Building, 20 Hing Yip Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong


Mail: info@osagegallery.com

Phone: +86 852 2793 4817
Web: Osage Hong Kong
Hours: Mon. - Sat. 10:30am - 6:30pm; Sun. 2:30pm - 6:30pm









26.9.14

The Shadow Factory curated by Gary- Ross Pastrana


16 April - 04 May 2014 By Cocoy Lumbao



As every work of art is unique, so are the individuals that are responsible for each artwork. Artists are characters, and are in themselves works-in-progress. These characters, just like their works, are susceptible to an audience’s criticisms, impressions, and varying standards of judgment. These judgments invariably affect the value ascribed to the piece each artist makes. The identity of the artist becomes inseparable to his art. Authorship is a concept embedded in each produced object, but it is a volatile concept, which can be as shadowy and as fictitious as the work of art itself.

In The Shadow Factory, curator Gary-Ross Pastrana sees identity and authorship as a platform for artists, a method for production at their disposal. As the title of the show is borrowed from a covert plan by allied forces during the Second World War to secretly turn generic factories into instruments for building aircraft, it reflects the same kind of scheme artists use to attend to a specific activity, usually veiled under a different persona. It recalls the time when Marcel Duchamp invented the character Rrose Selavy to undermine concepts in art-production, or the circumstances when writers and musicians assume a different name to undertake a specific genre dissimilar from works they are usually known for.

The Shadow Factory examines this prevailing concept that attest to the volatility of authorship in art: the artist’s inclination to conceal one’s identity. By presenting established artists with equally important projects under pseudonyms, pen names, alter egos or as part of an anonymous collective, the exhibition provides possible readings for the artists’ need to take on clandestine roles. Through the works of contemporary artists with fabricated personas such as Angel Flores,CrocogatorSaturnino BasillaTito & Tita, and artists taking on collective names to eradicate the idea of a single authorship such as BrokeDepartment of Everyday Productions, and The Weather BureauThe Shadow Factory re-evaluates these tendencies as a platform for the artist to produce a specific kind of art, which may entail mystery, anonymity, affinity, or the desire to re-invent oneself.

For some artists, a default nomenclature is not enough to justify the act of venturing into a different set of work. Whether out of psychological, socio-political, conceptual, formal or a mutual agenda, a different identity (or non-identity) has to be attached to the object produced. Different conditions can be associated with the move—more room for creative freedom, the exhilaration found in the creation of hidden identities, or the improvement in objectifying art by dislodging any personality or trait that can be attached to it. With this group of already established artists, cloaked and propped by a different set of name and a different set of work, sharing a common space may provide a brief illumination and an unmasking—to discover what lies behind the motive for their aliases.

The Shadow Factory with Angel Flores, Broke, Crocogator, Department of Everyday Productions, Saturnino Basilla, Tito & Tita, and The Weather Bureau runs from 16 April to 04 May 2014 at Silverlens Gillman Barracks at 47 Malan Road, #01-25 Gillman Barracks, Singapore 109444